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Facing Uncertainty Sheree Franklin

Navigating Uncertainty by Tapping Into Your Intuition

Have you ever reached a crucial point in your life when you struggled to know what you should do? One of the best times to learn how to tap into your intuition is when you’re faced with the need to navigate uncertainty.

Fear is the number one reason why we are usually afraid to make a decision. We don’t want to make a mistake, and our fear of this can get in our way.

When you find yourself feeling uncertain, try these 3 techniques to help you make a decision:

1. Breathe deeply. The first thing that happens when we get nervous or panicky is we start to breathe quickly. It is very easy to get hyperventilated. Becoming aware of your breath is a big way to connect with your intuition. Research indicates as little as two to three minutes of conscious breathing has a very calming effect.  Once you focus on your breath for a couple of minutes, pose to yourself the question that you need to be answered.

2. Once you pose the question, write down each and every thought and idea that comes to you. Whatever information you receive, keep it private for at least 48 hours. Often, when we tell another person what we want to do, they often tell us all the reasons why it cannot be done. We stimulate our minds when we allow our thoughts to flow without judgment. Allowing your imagination to flow is a great way to consider what you would do if money were no option or if you are able to move past your own self-imposed barrier…fear!

3. Develop an informal advisory council that you can trust to run your ideas by.  Calling your own shots does not meant that you should not seek wisdom from people you know and trust.  There are  various options you might consider in a time of crisis and being able to share minds with people who are not judgmental and have your best interests at heart is invaluable. By allowing yourself to run through various options you are able to become comfortable with what feels right or wrong for you. Keep your advisory council small with no more than 2 or 3 people. These should be individuals who are willing to share their past mistakes and keep your information confidential.

When we are fearful, it’s often because we are afraid of the unknown. When you need to get to the bottom of something, it is important that you take quiet time with yourself. By opening up to your intuition, it expands and accelerates the infinite possibilities to you in life.

And remember – you can’t always avoid making a mistake. If you do make a mistake, it’s important to remember that our mistakes are opportunities for growth. In fact, we often learn the most from our life experiences that do no turn out the way we planned.

 

Intuitive Life Strategist Sheree Franklin helps people to find the courage to release their life challenges in order to live in alignment with their true self.  She is the author of Intuition: The Hidden Asset Everyone Should Learn to Use.  To learn more about Franklin’s book go to www.amzn.to/1UxlWLG.

Sheree is a practitioner at Holistic Health Practice at One East Superior, in Chicago. You can email your questions at [email protected] Her practice includes one-on-one coaching as well as speaking to organizations, consulting and leading workshops. For more information, go to www.shereefranklin.com or call 312-664-8376.

 


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Intuition Operates at Light Speed to Guide Us Sheree Franklin

Jumpstart Your Intuition

Scientists tell us that our intuition operates at rocket speed and helps us to make choices on everything from our career to others’ trustworthiness, intelligence and even sex appeal in less than 10 seconds. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we had the conscious mind to tell ourselves to wait before making any decisions (big or small)?  Unfortunately, most of us rush through the choices we need to make because they come at us with breathtaking speed and/or we aren’t as tuned into our gut as we could be.

The challenge is: how can we transform ourselves to slow down our inherent busyness to make better decisions?

It’s easy to feel like we have to get things done quickly, especially when we’re faced with situations where we need to make a quick decision. For example, when I’m shopping online and the website tells me there are only 2 items left in the size I need, I feel compelled to make an immediate decision and either decide to go ahead and buy the item (with the thought that it can be returned), or I get too flustered to make an immediate decision, not sure what I should do … only to discover later on that the item I wanted is now unavailable (and live to regret my hesitation). This isn’t a life altering situation (unless it was that elusive perfect dress), but it’s indicative of what happens when quick decisions — of large and small magnitude — need to be made.

How can we improve our abilities to make better decisions in less time with less stress? Here are 5 tips:

  1.  Stop and take deep 6 deep breaths, then pose to yourself the question that you need an answer to. Ask for the answer to be revealed to you so clearly you cannot ignore the message.
  2. Trust your gut. Most of us are intuitively aware of our body’s warning signs when we are making a bad choice  Sometimes it happens at the most inopportune moments, such as  feeling confused about whether to jump on another expressway or allowing yourself to get so angry at your boss that you forget to censor your remarks.
  3. Let yourself off the hook. No one is perfect and making mistakes is part of the human experience. The biggest lesson to learn is how to forgive yourself when things do not turn out the way you planned. My last big boo-boo occurred when I thought I was  sending a text to my sister about an old boyfriend I ran into and had not seen in a long time. He was the man I always felt had “gotten away” and seeing him opened my eyes to the fact that despite his education, wealth and position, his health was terrible. Unfortunately, in my haste to text, I mistakenly sent the message to him! Realizing my mistake I owned up to my text right away and apologized for sounding insensitive. Needless to say, he did not respond at that time (although texted to wish me a happy birthday at my next birthday). If we ever see each other again, you can bet I will not send any texts about it to anyone! If I must, I will follow steps 1 and 2 above and follow my own advice first.
  4. Surround yourself with people who admit they make mistakes and are open to sharing how they fixed them.
  5. Finally, set the intention at the start of each day to embrace and feel the emotion of hope very deeply, believing that every day above ground is a good one!

Intuitive Life Strategist Sheree Franklin helps people to find the courage to release their life challenges in order to live in alignment with their true self.  She is the author of Intuition: The Hidden Asset Everyone Should Learn to Use.  To learn more about Franklin’s book go to www.amzn.to/1UxlWLG.

Sheree is a practitioner at Holistic Health Practice at One East Superior, in Chicago. You can email your questions at [email protected] Her practice includes one-to-one coaching as well as speaking to organizations. For more information go to www.shereefranklin.com or call 312-664-8376.


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Safety and Intuition Sheree Franklin

Use Your Intuition To Stay Safe

As we age, the ability to access our intuition has the power to expand our consciousness and to adjust to the changes that are always going on around us. While we may not able to run as fast or have greater strength than a person who attempts to steal or attack us, an aware mind can quickly assess danger and direct us to take action rather than sit around and wait to see what will happen.

The best way to be aware of your intuition is to pay attention to what is going on in your body. Think of your body as your internal laboratory that provides us with signals and clues to what is going on in and around at all times. Intuition is not passive; it is an active energy that affects everything we do.

Learning your own individual internal signs is critical to staying safe. Do words pass through your head? Do you feel danger in your stomach? Your jaws? Your skin? Pay attention to the subtle (or not so subtle) unique clues your body gives you. Also, develop the habit of of setting the intention to connect with your inner wisdom every day when you first wake up. Visualize a beautiful shield of protective light around you, your communities and your family. Before you enter your home – or enter any new environment – develop the habit of allowing yourself to “feel” what is going on before you go inside.  It is especially important to do a quick check before entering into an elevator or other confined spaces.  Do not be concerned about hurting someone’s feelings if you decide not to enter somewhere you don’t feel safe. Listen to your inner guidance rather than discounting it.

It’s also important to note (and remember) that the potential to be come a victim is greater when we are mindlessly talking on our cell phones or not paying attention to what is going on around us. You can’t pay attention to your intuition if you leave no space for it.

 

Intuitive Life Strategist Sheree Franklin helps people to find the courage to release their life challenges in order to live in alignment with their true self. She is the author of Intuition: The Hidden Asset Everyone Should Learn to Use. To learn more about Franklin’s book go to www.amzn.to/1UxlWLG.

Sheree is a practitioner at Holistic Health Practice at One East Superior, in Chicago. You can email your questions at [email protected] Her practice includes one-to-one coaching as well as speaking to organizations, consulting and leading workshops. For more information go to www.shereefranklin.com or call 312-664-8376.

 


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Intuition Sheree Franklin

Intuitive People Should Hang Out With People Who Value Their Hunches

People who want to sharpen their intuitive abilities will benefit greatly from hanging out with individuals who value this skill and are supportive. When each person is free to explore and openly discuss their hunches, insights or intuitive thoughts, it actually increases the influence of inner knowing. Research shows that when you spend time with people who respect and believe in intuition, your gut instinct gets stronger!

My advice for those who wish to develop their intuitive muscle is to allow for variety in your life.  Limit time with inflexible or rigid people who are judgmental about your hunches. When you start to pay attention to the flow of your life — without censoring, editing or discounting — it allows you the freedom to explore your inner feelings and gut instincts. Resist sorting out your experiences according to what you think they ought to be or what you’re told is “acceptable.”

Developing your intuition is innate and natural and often inspired by the people you connect with in our daily lives. Allowing yourself to freely express your interests (and the positive feedback you receive) are two of the most critical factors in expanding your senses.

When you connect with people who are judgmental about your intuition, the experience can can pack an emotional wallop that blocks you from sensing things around you. The emotional significance of being with people who support your need to explore the spiritual side of life allows for an expansive view of things in life.

Living intuitively allows for you to:
1. Expand your other senses.
2. Operate from the sense of seeing everything as “living in perfection.”
3. Set aside ego-based desires and preferences and let life flow and unfold on its own.

By living intuitively you will probably discover that the universe will meet you more than halfway. Sharpening this skill may lead to a more joyful, prosperous and healthy life.

 

Intuitive Life Strategist Sheree Franklin helps people to find the courage to release their life challenges in order to live in alignment with their true self.  She is the author of Intuition: The Hidden Asset Everyone Should Learn to Use.  To learn more about Franklin’s book go to www.amzn.to/1UxlWLG. Sheree is a practitioner at Holistic Health Practice at One East Superior, in Chicago. You can email your questions at [email protected] Her practice includes one-to-one coaching as well as speaking to organizations and leading workshops. For more information, go to www.shereefranklin.com or call 312-664-8376.


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Intuition Quote from Sheree Franklin

Learning to Forgive Yourself After You Ignore Your Intuition

Have you ever looked in a person’s eyes and knew immediately that something was wrong? Saying what you sense can be risky because you never know how the other person will take the information. And what happens if you are so convinced that your intuition is correct that you take it a step further and share your concerns and the individual flicks it off like a piece of lint?

It’s easy for me to rely on my own intuition to help guide my life, because that is what I do in my work. But getting a person who is not a trusted friend or a client to listen is often a lot harder. And there’s the other issue of me being morally committed to not violate another person’s privacy and giving them information without being asked.

My internal struggle with knowing when to say something led to me write this blog post today. It involved a carpenter who was working on a big project in our building. The difficulty of the job was due, in part, because “Bill”  had to interact with one female in our cooperative who has a DNA for control. He was a friendly guy and, unfortunately, made the mistake of giving his cell phone number to the female bully. She ended up calling him all hours of the day and night. When faced with this behavior, he did not establish boundaries and tell her to stop or simply decide to keep his cell phone turned off when he went home. Bill’s reactions to her mirrored those of others in our cooperative who would do anything rather than go up against the female bully. I faced the same dilemma myself, after serving for 3 years on the Board, and made the decision to resign when we got into a shouting match over the phone, and I decided to listen when my intuition it told me, “she is not worth it.”

One particular day I looked “Bill” in the eye and saw what I sensed as a feeling of hopelessness. The feeling hit me so hard I took the time to ask him if everything was okay and if he was getting enough rest. Bill pushed off my comment and gave me a fake smile to back up that “everything was okay.” When I got to work, the feeling I had about Bill kept nagging me, and I decided to call his boss and suggest that perhaps his worker needed some time off. I mentioned the strong personality he was dealing with and my sense of what was present in Bill’s eyes.

The owner on the company is a good man, but he had also fallen into the same stressed out camp of allowing the female bully to bully him. I guess it is easy to understand why my suggestion fell on deaf ears.

A week or so later, Bill, the carpenter quit. It turned out he was a recovering alcoholic and had relapsed. All this happened well over a year ago, but it all came flooding back when the owner of the construction company sent me a text recently, telling me that Bill had died of alcoholism.

As you can imagine, the owner of the company is in pain over all this. And even though he is not a client, I gave him the following spiritual treatment suggestions to help him though this period:

1. Each day, say the Serenity Prayer as many times as possible.
2. While driving, when feelings of anxiety and guilt come up, say the Lord’s Prayer out loud at least ten times.
3. Remember funny stories about Bill and pray for his family and children.
4. Reach out to the family on a consistent basis and do random acts of kindness on a regular basis.

The news of Bill’s death affected me deeply too, I had to follow my own treatment advice above, because there is still a nagging feeling inside that I could have done more to help.

In hindsight, I realize how easy it was for me to recognize the warning signs in Bill’s eyes because alcoholism has played a role in two critical male relationships in my life. First, my Dad was an alcoholic during my teenage years. This was over 30 years ago, and people did not talk about alcoholism like they do today. My mother’s way of handling it was to tell us that nothing was wrong. This experience so affected me that I only realized the full impact it had on my life when I had to come to grips with the fact that my first marriage was to an alcoholic.

My dad eventually stopped drinking and became the kind of father who supported us all and did everything he could to help others. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for my first husband. We divorced, and he has never been able to beat this dreadful disease.

This morning, the old hurts came flooding back over this young man I knew only briefly who died. And I would be remiss if I did not mention that I do have resentment in my heart over the female bully in my building who I believe played a part in pushing him over the edge.  The owner of the company and I agreed that we would not share the news of Bill’s death with her. I have watched her long enough to realize that she has no capacity for guilt, so telling her would not change anything.  And, of course, she was most likely not the only factor in causing Bill’s relapse. As a recovering alcoholic, there is no telling the other issues he was facing.

As part of the human experience, we owe it to each other to attempt to discuss our intuitive concerns with people we care about. Yes, it is risky and not everyone will admit to you that they are in trouble. But saying nothing will hurt much worse if something occurs and you find yourself living with regret because you didn’t take the chance to express what you sensed.

Intuitive Life Strategist Sheree Franklin helps people to find the courage to release their life challenges in order to live in alignment with their true self. She is the author of Intuition: The Hidden Asset Everyone Should Learn to Use.  To learn more about Franklin’s book go to www.amzn.to/1UxlWLG.

Sheree Franklin is a practitioner at Holistic Health Practice at One East Superior, in Chicago. You can email your questions at [email protected] Her practice includes one-to-one coaching as well as speaking to organizations. For more information go to www.shereefranklin.com or call 312-664-8376.


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be your own best friend sheree franklin

Part 4 – Women’s Friendships: the Most Important Relationship

This is Part 4 in a 4-part series about Women’s Friendships by Sheree Franklin

It may sound cliche, but there is nothing truer: the most important type of friendship women need is one with themselves. Being our own best friend is necessary for our happiness and to enhance all the other friendships and relationships in our lives.

Be Your Own Best Friend

One of the first homework assignments I give my clients is to ask them to monitor their thoughts for 2 days.  Being aware of what we say to ourselves is instrumental in our relationship with ourselves.  It is all too common for a woman to tell herself she is not pretty enough, too fat, always does everything wrong, looks bad in the clothes she has on and even that she is not wise in choosing friends.  If there is one major theme that comes through in the 300 female clients I have seen, it is that we must learn to love ourselves.  Loving ourselves helps to round out the rough edges when we do screw up or when a friendship ends through no fault of our own.

To love yourself AND nurture the friendships you have with others, follow these guidelines:

  1.  Keep your word (to yourself and others) – One of the main things many of my female client’s mention when a friendship ends is that one of the primary reasons was due to violation of their trust.
  2. Stop Being Critical (of yourself and others) –   There is no question that women are hard themselves … and often on each other.  In less then 3 minutes, a woman has often completely dissected and analyzed another female’s hair and clothes.  I have a dear friend who is fashionista, and I jokingly tell her when I leave the room, “Please do not talk about me.”
  3. Vet the candidate – Before you open your heart and soul to a new friend, give yourself a chance to test the relationship.  Share an experience or concerns that you have and wait to see how this person responds and, more importantly, whether they share the information with anyone else.
  4. End a friendship with class – A woman who is rejected by a friend often experiences feelings and emotions that are similar to a romantic relationship break-up.  If you are the person who has been dumped, try to find out what caused the rift.  Your former friend may not be willing to tell you, and if that is the case, maintain your self-esteem by not continuing to call or text.   And if the two of you are still connected through your other friends, do yourself a favor and do not attempt to bring others into your rift by asking them to take sides. As much as it hurts, remember we all have free will, and this gives us the right to choose who want to let into our lives.  If you and your former friend travel in the same circles, when you see each other give the person a cordial greeting and keep it moving.
  5. Give as good as you get – A number of my female clients talk about feeling burned out when a friend is constantly involved in a crisis or emergency on a daily basis.  Make sure you balance your friendships and, if the need arises for serious discussion over a prolonged problem or issue of yours, consider seeing a counselor or therapist (or, if it’s your friend who has an issue, suggest they seek counseling).
  6. Pay attention to your intuition – Many of my female clients have shared that they knew ahead of time that something was amiss in their friendships before anything happened and they chose to ignore it hoping it would go away, either because they had guilt attached to the situation or they did not like to deal with conflict.
  7. Stay in Your Lane – It is common for women to want to protect their friends who are in dysfunctional relationships.  Be careful what you say about your buddy’s husband or partner.  People have a funny way of getting back together again, and it is not unusual for them to share the things you have said to the other person.
  8. Forgive yourself –  There is not a person alive who has not made mistakes in relationships.  Be sure to apologize for anything that caused a friendship to end.  And if you are still deeply hurt after six months, you might want to consider talking to a counselor or therapist. Once you have cleared up the past, the best thing you can do is to forgive yourself. Research shows that when we relive painful experiences over and over again, we experience the same chemical reactions to the stress as when the the event first occurred.  Learning to make up with yourself goes a long way to help you heal, stay healthy and handle the hellos and good-byes we all inevitably face in our lives.

Intuitive Life Strategist Sheree Franklin helps others find the courage to release their life challenges in order to live in alignment with their true self. She is the author of Intuition: The Hidden Asset Everyone Should Learn to Use.  To learn more about Franklin’s book go to www.amzn.to/1UxlWLG. Sheree is a practitioner at Holistic Health Practice at One East Superior, in Chicago. Her practice includes one-to-one coaching as well as corporate and organizational workshops and speeches.  For more information go to www.shereefranklin.com or call 312-664-8376.

 


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women's friendships intuition sheree franklin

Women’s Friendships, Part 3: How Women Know Intuitively When to Take a Chance on a New Friend

This is Part 3 in a 4-part series about Women’s Friendships by Sheree Franklin

Women often know when they intuitively “click” with a new female friend.  It can happen in the strangest places…standing in a long bathroom line at a concert, sitting in a chair next to another woman in the hair salon, shopping for vegetables at Whole Foods and sometimes living next door to a person who always has your back.  There is no owner’s manual on how these friendships begin, but if you are willing to open yourself up to a new friend, these are the friendships that will often make your world infinitely better and give you a reason to smile each day!

In this Part 3 series on women’s friendships, we will explore Energy-Raising  Friendships.

Energy-Raising Friendships

This type of friendship does not develop over a defined time period.  When the two women meet, they know intuitively that they feel good about being around each other. They do not judge one another, and they like the fact that they both act as each other’s “cheerleaders,” providing support when it’s needed. The two friends who meet spontaneously know in their hearts that the new person they met gets them at a soul level. Each person is authentic and speaks from the heart, even when what they have to say is not easy to express.  Each person has a good understanding of their own emotional baggage and has worked to release and forgive the past.  The two women are sensitive to each other’s needs and work together to resolve differences quickly.  Even if they do not see each other for a long period of time, whenever they connect the two immediately pick up wherever they left off.

Risk factor:  It can be difficult to trust a new sustaining friendship, especially if you have been hurt in the past or are not open to taking risks with new people.  Also, despite your busyness, it is important to make time for a sustaining friendship.  People do not want to feel that they are another item on your to-do-list or that you only make time for the friendship when you do not have a date or when your partner or husband is out of town.  The biggest risk is that the two women will meet and recognize their special connection and neither one will make the effort by either getting their cell phone number and/or making and keeping plans to see their new friend.

Lessons to learn:  Both people must be willing to risk vulnerability with the other person.  In addition, they must find out the other’s person’s special interests and needs and follow-through in making plans to see each other when time permits.

Intuitive Life Strategist Sheree Franklin helps people to find the courage to release their life challenges in order to live in alignment with their true self. She is the author of Intuition: The Hidden Asset Everyone Should Learn to Use.  To learn more about Franklin’s book go to www.amzn.to/1UxlWLG.  Sheree Franklin is a practitioner at Holistic Health Practice at One East Superior, in Chicago. Her practice includes one-to-one coaching as well as speaking to corporate and nonprofit organizations. For more information, go to www.shereefranklin.com or call 312-664-8376.

 


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intuition and women friendships sheree franklin

Women’s Friendships, Part 2: Should Women Check in With Their Intuition Before Choosing a New Friend?

This is Part 2 in a 4-part series about Women’s Friendships by Sheree Franklin

In my work as an Intuitive Coach and Counselor, romantic and family relationships aren’t the only ones that cause my clients pain. Many of my female clients come in feeling like their hearts have been ripped out when a female friendship ends, seeking answers to the most common question: WHY?

There is no way we can protect ourselves from being hurt, but women can consciously choose to be more intuitively aware of the relationships that they choose to bring into their lives.

When I work with women around these issues, my process begins with what I call “peeling back the onion,” as I ask my client to explore internally the following two questions:

  1. How did the friendship begin?
  2. What warning signs did you receive, intuitively, about the person from the very beginning that you either ignored or swept under the rug?

Gently guiding my clients through a deep breathing exercise, while considering these two questions, helps them tap into information that their intuition has logged into their subconscious mind.

“The information is always there if you choose to listen.” (from my book Intuition: The Hidden Asset Everyone Should to Learn to Use)

Through my sessions with over 300 female clients, I have developed a model of the four types of friendships women operate in, the risk each type of relationship poses, and the lessons that can be learned in these interactions. In Part 1 of my Women’s Friendships article series, I discuss Acquaintance Friendship.

The second common female friendship type I have identified are what I call apprentice friendships.

Apprentice Friendships
These are friendships that have been ongoing for 5 years or less. Both people are actively engaged in trying to figure each other out to determine if the friendship is of value to them. Many of these friendships are based on shared experiences, and the further you get away from what the two of you have gone through together, the easier it is for the relationship to no longer be a priority.

Risk factors: If a conflict occurs in these short term friendships, the two individuals usually do not have the foundation to work through their differences. Many women know intuitively at the time of the disagreement that there will not be a second chance to mend the relationship.

Lessons to be learned: Conflicts that arise within these types of friendships can be resolved, but only if both friends are willing to be totally honest and to discuss their issues without holding anything back. If one person is not willing to invest the time and effort to work out their differences, it will be impossible to put the friendship back together.

If you encounter a situation where your friend will not discuss things with you and you value the friendship, put your ego aside and let the other person know it does not matter who is right or wrong, that the friendship is important to you. Giving an apology does not guarantee that the other person will respond or even try to work things out.  Repeated attempts to reach out to the person who does not want to be bothered will cause emotional pain to the person who is trying to work things out.  It is better to reclaim your power and chalk this friendship up to an opportunity for growth.

Healing the emotional pain of being dumped takes the ability to (1) Forgive yourself for past mistakes and (2) Release feelings of anger or resentment toward your former friend.  If the two of you continue to operate in the same personal or business circle, confine your comments to a cordial greeting and keep other friends that both of you know from being involved or asking them to take sides.  In other words, keep it moving when you see each other and remember that the best “revenge” is to have a good and happy life!

Intuitive Life Strategist Sheree Franklin helps people to find the courage to release their life challenges in order to live in alignment with their true self. She is the author of Intuition: The Hidden Asset Everyone Should Learn to Use.  To learn more about Franklin’s book go to www.amzn.to/1UxlWLG.  Sheree Franklin is a practitioner at Holistic Health Practice at One East Superior, in Chicago. Her practice includes one-to-one coaching as well as speaking to corporate and nonprofit organizations. For more information, go to www.shereefranklin.com or call 312-664-8376.


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women friendships sheree franklin

Women’s Friendships, Part I: Do Women Intuitively Choose Their Friends?

This is Part 1 in a 4-part series about Women’s Friendships.

Many women share a deep emotional connection with their female friends. Research shows this type of friendship is important because it provides the vital support to help women feel positive and stay healthy. Unfortunately, there is no magic formula or crystal ball for what it takes to make a successful friendship work, and women’s ability to maintain lasting friendships has become more complicated due busy schedules, lifestyle changes and our reliance on technology to communicate with each other.

Technology may be the most significant change. Many people keep their electronic devices on 24/7 communicating and recording their personal thoughts, feelings and actions at all hours of the day and night. Text messages and emails have become the norm for keeping in touch, making it the exception to the rule for women to actually sit and talk with each other. As a result, women today are missing the valuable intuitive insights that occur when we observe the body language, facial expressions and tone of our friend’s voice.

More than half of my female clients struggle to some degree with problems they are facing with their friends. And women aren’t the only ones. Gay males are the second client group who has the most difficulty in maintaining their friendships. Heterosexual males also have conflicts with their friends, but their relationships do not end with the same emotional pain that women go through if things don’t work out.

Through my sessions with over 300 female clients, I have developed a model of the four types of friendships women operate in, the risk each type of relationship poses, and the lessons that can be learned in these interactions.

Women need to be intuitively aware of the types of friends they attract into their lives. This is the first of four female friendship types that I will share.  My next blog article will focus on the second type.

Acquaintance Friendship
These friendships develop with the people who are involved in the same areas of our lives that matter most to us. This includes our hobbies, work, school, social and professional organizations, our kids, and places where we receive personal services.

Risk factors: Some acquaintance friendships develop due to a strategical or tactical need. This makes it easy for one friend to end contact when the other “acquaintance” no longer serves a purpose. The friend who is no longer of value is usually hurt when their phone calls, emails or texts are either not responded to for a week or more or not answered at all.

Lessons to learn: The ability to transition into a deeper level of friendship is based on how you feel intuitively about the other person. If your only priority is to focus on what your “friend” can do for you, this is not a good foundation for a friendship to develop. It’s not unusual for women to stay in an acquaintance friendship indefinitely. This type of friendship can be mutually beneficial to both people as long as they are upfront with their motives for being in each other’s lives. Problems usually develop when women stay in this type of friendship too long and forget how and why it developed.


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Intuition Kicks in 7 Seconds

Scientists tell us that our intuition operates at rocket speed and helps us to make choices on everything from career choices, trustworthiness, intelligence and even sex appeal in less than 10 seconds.  That’s an amazingly short time period, especially if most of the choices and decisions we’re facing happen in the early morning hours, when our brains have just started to warm up.

Since it takes me a while to shake the cobwebs out of my brain (usually after one or two cups of green tea), I seriously question the accuracy of this information.  My question is: how we can speed up our brain alertness to best handle situations that call for our intuition to be the sharpest?

Here are three ideas to help get your brain cells in tip top shape at the beginning of each day:

The first may (or may not) surprise you, and is only advisable if you have someone trustworthy to get up close and personal with: have really great morning sex! Have you ever noticed that when we completely relax and enjoy ourselves through sexual stimulation that it has a two-fold effect? One, our bodies feel better and two, we are often smiling a lot more.

If a morning tryst is not an option for you, consider turning on your favorite music and dancing around in your pj’s a few minutes each morning.

Finally, start  the day feeling the emotion of hope very deeply and believing that every day above ground is a good one.

Here’s a link to an article with more information and tips about intuition effectiveness in the morning:

http://elitedaily.com/life/morning-routine-sharpen-intuition/1487825/

 

 

 


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I N T U I T I O N - The Hidden Asset Everyone Should Learn To Use